Night

Night: a story by Elie Wiesel
Night is a story about the holocaust written by Elie Wiesel a holocaust survivor who spent most of world war 2 in many concentration camps around Germany and Poland looking after his father and barely getting by. Night has a very cruel and personal tone as the purpose of the novel I to show what really happened during the holocaust and in the camps all through events he experienced firsthand. The tone is set by the way he describes very brutal events he witnessed such as the death of his family his friends and the eventual death of the person he used to be. At one point he even considers leaving his father behind so he wouldn’t have to bear the responsibility of looking after him. “I went to look for him Yet at the same time a thought crept into my mind If only I didn’t find him! If only I were relieved of this responsibility, I could use all my strength to fight for my own survival, to take care only of myself … Instantly, I felt ashamed of myself forever.” (8.3-23) Elie considers this to be the death of who he once was.

A good example of a quote/event that helps set the personal and very dark an realistic tone of the novel is when Elie is thrown into his very first separation at Birkenau where he is separated from his mother and sister forever and he realizes his father is all he has left and that no matter what he cant lose him to. “” Men to the left! Women to the right! ” “Eight words spoken quietly, indifferently, without emotion. Eight simple, short words. Yet that was the moment when I left my mother. There was no time to think, and I already I felt my father’s hand press against mine: we were alone. In a fraction of a second I could see my mother, my sisters, move to the right. Tzipora was holding Mother’s hand. I saw them walking farther and farther away; Mother was stroking my sister’s blond hair, as if to protect her. And I walked on with my father, with the men. I didn’t know that this was the moment in time and the place where I was leaving my mother and Tzipora forever. I kept walking, my father holding my hand.My hand tightened its grip on my father. All I could think of was not to lose him. Not to remain alone. It was imperative to stay together. (3.4-10)